Transition Activities and Services

Transition services refers to a coordinated set of activities for a child with a disability and is based on instruction, related services, community experiences, development of employment, other post-school adult living objectives, acquisition of daily living skills, and/or provision of a functional vocational evaluation.

Transition Services/Coordinated Set of Activities Examples

Acquisition of Daily Living Skills

Daily living skills are those activities that adults do most every day. These can include such things as
preparing meals, budgeting, maintaining a residence, paying bills, raising a family, caring for clothing,
and/or personal grooming.

Community Experiences

Activities/strategies listed in this area emphasize activities/strategies that are generally provided outside the school building and that prepare the student for participation in community life. These activities should encourage the student to participate in the community, including government, social, recreational, leisure, shopping, banking, transportation, or other opportunities.
 

Development of Employment

Activities/strategies listed in this area focus on development of work-related behaviors, job seeking and keeping skills, career exploration, skill training, apprenticeship training, and actual employment.
 

Functional Vocational Evaluation

A functional vocational evaluation is an assessment process that provides information about job or career interests, aptitudes, and skills. Information is gathered through situational assessments in the setting where the job is performed. This can include observations, formal or informal measures, and should be practical. Information gathered through a functional vocational assessment can be used to refine educational experiences, courses of study, and employment activities/strategies in the statement of needed transition services.

Instruction

Activities/strategies listed in this area have to do with “instruction,” whether that is a formal or informal imparting of knowledge or skills.  The activities/strategies can include, but are not limited to, such things as: Broad curricular areas of needed coursework, educational experiences, skill training, etc.; Activities/strategies that are necessary to prepare for and take part in college, continuing education, further skill training, adult living, etc.
 

Other Post-School Independent Living Objectives

Activities/strategies listed in this area emphasize activities/strategies that focus on independent living skills. These are generally those activities that are done occasionally such as registering to vote, filing taxes, obtaining a driver’s license, renting a home, accessing medical services, obtaining and filing for insurance, and accessing adult services such as Social Security.